Inspo: Black & White Interior Stripes – Will You Go Bold?

One of the eye catching stand outs at Spring Fair at the start of this year was something   smashing it’s way back into interiors. It’s now officially nigh on impossible to miss the boldness of black and white stripes. Although a classic, they haven’t really been super hot since the 80’s. It’s no coincidence that since the 80’s are back on trend amongst Millennials who didn’t catch ’em first time around, so are these Liquorice Allsorts lovelies. Whether in living rooms or legs, a la the lead image by Camille Walala & Jess Bonham, stripes need to be part of your 2018 design kit.

Now, as I said, they’re a classic and a tonne of design articles and blog posts featuring them already exist, but are starting to look a tad, well, dated. Although there’s nothing new about the stripes themselves, here are some pointers on how to bring in a 2018 vibe.

Team With Jewelled Velvet

Black & White striped sofa at All BrightLush velvet is scorchio (see previous blog post), as is green marble, but both can be as  stale as old bread if not given an edgy twist. One of the tricks to 2018’s thick black and white stripes is throwing them together with unexpected luxury items, this way the luxe items look less Lady Grantham and more edgy Elle Decor. Rich, jewelled colours like ochre, forest green and midnight blue are key to this look, and stop the decor leaning towards student simplicity.

Super cool female entrepreneur support network and space All Bright, launched last Autumn, have this vibe rocking their London Member’s Club. No musty old boys network interiors there.IMG_2317‘Girl About House’ Sarah visited a London development called Mapleton Crescent, designed by Milc Style (above)  and guess what caught at my design eye. Yep, the verticals peeping out from behind butterflies and foliage. Analyse the scheme, navy plush velvet headboard, organic timber, earthy toned blown glass – all luxe materials but given the edge by the stripes. Fab.IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpgAussie based Greenhouse Interiors and Ioanna Lennox Interiors  collaborated to style a campaign for artist Elle Campbell and nail this look completely. The striped wallpaper gives the perfect backdrop to the artwork, with the velvet foreground seating adding opulence. Why do any of us have white walls again?!

Chevrons & Herringbone

DSC07982.jpgStripes are a heritage staple, however there’s something very modern feeling about herringbone or chevrons right now isn’t there? Breaking up stripes into chunks and then offsetting them gives the eye something to play with, especially sitting against a neutral decor. These cushions I photographed on the Coach House stand at Spring Fair are a great example of a very affordable updating trick. You may not be able to afford a new season sofa, but most of us can stretch to a cushion.

The Hoxton London Chevron floor in loosOk, maybe a tad braver than a cushion, but again this sticks to a simple palette and allow the simple black and white to steal the show.

The loos in The Hoxton Holborn. White brick ♥ Round mirrors ♥ Trad basins  ♥

THAT FLOOR  ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Mixing Stripes and Botanicals

Bold stripes are also popping up in my Instafeed, with strong choices being made from on the money homeware brands. Look at these from Asda of all places.Flamingo cushion AsdaNot only do I love the fabric mix in this image taken by Your Home Or Mine but the caption was brilliant: “Funny story…. so last week I popped into Asda for a pint of milk, and walked out with a flamingo cushion under my arm”. As you do 🙂

Teaming black and white with neons and jungle prints looks completely fabulous and very new season. IMG_2361.jpgMaybe Asda got their ‘inspo’ from the fabric maestro Christian Lacroix, whose work totally floats my boat. I Ikea-hacked our guest bedroom bed using a jungle fabric of theirs last year and now feel the need to thrown in some striped cushions too. He just has a way of throwing together the unexpected and making it work amazingly well. You can find his fabric at Designers Guild, amongst other places.

Earthy Pastels

I’ve a whole post coming up soon devoted to these new pastels and you’d imagine that this sort of Scandi vibe might not sit well with a stripe. If however, the pastel is textured, interesting and not being used in a ‘classic’ (read: boring) way, it sits very well indeed.IMG_2065This 2018 InstaPeek shot from Mandarin Stone feels very fresh doesn’t it, with the new season peachy tones and sea foam blue. When Mr M and I drove down to their HQ to buy our marble bathroom tiles back in 2016, I was lucky enough to get a sneak preview of some of the forthcoming ranges for last year and chatted with the company buyers about title trends. Expanding from their traditional stone buyer base, they’re making some bold decisions, in response to brave buyers, social media, inspirational  trade shows and tile making innovations. People are being MUCH more adventurous in their design choices at home, even with items like tiles which aren’t seasonally changed.

Monochrome tiling, especially on floors, is a classic choice but I get the feeling that we’re going to be seeing a whole raft of incredibly individual choices in bathrooms. Rather than just simple striped floors and white walls, I’ve looked into my crystal ball and can attest, there are interesting times ahead.

Sweet Temptations

Taking a step back, the first time I actually noticed this touch of the crazy coming through at trade shows was at last year’s LDF, more specifically at Camile Walala’s installation at Broadgate’s Exchange Square. Playful and fun, Villa Walala  was designed to help office workers de-stress on their commute or lunch time break.DSC07009
Villa Walala Trend for Black and White Stripes 2018Aptly named Bertie Bassett’s Bedroom, it’s often one person’s vision which kickstarts a trend and for me, this was it. Installations like this embolden both the people immersed in the design world and visitors, sewing seeds into their subconscious. PRs, journalists and bloggers see the images and smile, making them more receptive when other stripes appear in press releases or from brands. Though we might not see this, in person or in print, and immediately think I gotta have a giant blow up liquorice allsort in my sitting room, we’re much more receptive to the watered down version. A sofa. A rug. A cushion.

Mixing black and white stripes with colourful sweet shop hues is most definitely only for the bonkers, but they are out there and they are doing it already. Marcel Wanders has pretty much nailed the market in this kind of colour explosion, and often tempers it with monochrome.

marcel_wanders_mondrian_doha_hotel_interior_maximalism_5.0
Image: Dezeen

The new Mondrian Doha, I mean, there are barely words to describe it are there. He’s just a complete genius. Clearly mad, but a genius. It’s all about taking something so simple and magnifying it beyond belief, making it larger than life and magical.

Let this be a lesson to us all. For a touch of this magic, you can literally throw monochrome stripes in anywhere for 2018 and get a big design tick, but it’s best to work the style which complement your interior.

And whilst we’re at it, this just goes to prove my personal zeitgeist theory that when something is meant to be, you can’t escape it….

IMG_2239What have interior design stripes got to do with the Tokyo Housing Crisis? I mean, what?  Nothing that’s what. But how cool is this image? And how much did it leap out of the keyboard as me whilst scrolling though Twitter?

Just goes to show when you like something, you see it everywhere. And I guarantee that you’ll be seeing black and white stripes everywhere from now on 😉

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